Difference between revisions of "Power"

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= Unbalanced randomization =
 
= Unbalanced randomization =
 
[https://www.rdatagen.net/post/can-unbalanced-randomization-improve-power/ Can unbalanced randomization improve power?]
 
[https://www.rdatagen.net/post/can-unbalanced-randomization-improve-power/ Can unbalanced randomization improve power?]
 +
 +
[https://www.rdatagen.net/post/unbalanced-randomization-can-improve-power-in-some-situations/ Yes, unbalanced randomization can improve power, in some situations]

Revision as of 13:14, 15 April 2020

Power analysis/Sample Size determination

Power analysis for default Bayesian t-tests

http://daniellakens.blogspot.com/2016/01/power-analysis-for-default-bayesian-t.html

Using simulation for power analysis: an example based on a stepped wedge study design

https://www.rdatagen.net/post/using-simulation-for-power-analysis-an-example/

Power analysis and sample size calculation for Agriculture

http://r-video-tutorial.blogspot.com/2017/07/power-analysis-and-sample-size.html

Power calculation for proportions (shiny app)

https://juliasilge.shinyapps.io/power-app/

Derive the formula/manual calculation

[math]\displaystyle{ \begin{align} Power & = P_{\mu_1-\mu_2 = \Delta}(\frac{\bar{X}_1 - \bar{X}_2}{\sqrt{\sigma^2/n + \sigma^2/n}} \gt Z_{\alpha /2}) + P_{\mu_1-\mu_2 = \Delta}(\frac{\bar{X}_1 - \bar{X}_2}{\sqrt{\sigma^2/n + \sigma^2/n}} \lt -Z_{\alpha /2}) \\ & \approx P_{\mu_1-\mu_2 = \Delta}(\frac{\bar{X}_1 - \bar{X}_2}{\sqrt{\sigma^2/n + \sigma^2/n}} \gt Z_{\alpha /2}) \\ & = P_{\mu_1-\mu_2 = \Delta}(\frac{\bar{X}_1 - \bar{X}_2 - \Delta}{\sqrt{2 * \sigma^2/n}} \gt Z_{\alpha /2} - \frac{\Delta}{\sqrt{2 * \sigma^2/n}}) \\ & = \Phi(-(Z_{\alpha /2} - \frac{\Delta}{\sqrt{2 * \sigma^2/n}})) \\ & = 1 - \beta =\Phi(Z_\beta) \end{align} }[/math]

Therefore

[math]\displaystyle{ \begin{align} Z_{\beta} &= - Z_{\alpha/2} + \frac{\Delta}{\sqrt{2 * \sigma^2/n}} \\ Z_{\beta} + Z_{\alpha/2} & = \frac{\Delta}{\sqrt{2 * \sigma^2/n}} \\ 2 * (Z_{\beta} + Z_{\alpha/2})^2 * \sigma^2/\Delta^2 & = n \\ n & = 2 * (Z_{\beta} + Z_{\alpha/2})^2 * \sigma^2/\Delta^2 \end{align} }[/math]
# alpha = .05, delta = 200, n = 79.5, sigma=450
1 - pnorm(1.96 - 200*sqrt(79.5)/(sqrt(2)*450)) + pnorm(-1.96 - 200*sqrt(79.5)/(sqrt(2)*450))
# [1] 0.8
pnorm(-1.96 - 200*sqrt(79.5)/(sqrt(2)*450))
# [1] 9.58e-07
1 - pnorm(1.96 - 200*sqrt(79.5)/(sqrt(2)*450)) 
# [1] 0.8

Calculating required sample size in R and SAS

pwr package is used. For two-sided test, the formula for sample size is

[math]\displaystyle{ n_{\mbox{each group}} = \frac{2 * (Z_{\alpha/2} + Z_\beta)^2 * \sigma^2}{\Delta^2} = \frac{2 * (Z_{\alpha/2} + Z_\beta)^2}{d^2} }[/math]

where [math]\displaystyle{ Z_\alpha }[/math] is value of the Normal distribution which cuts off an upper tail probability of [math]\displaystyle{ \alpha }[/math], [math]\displaystyle{ \Delta }[/math] is the difference sought, [math]\displaystyle{ \sigma }[/math] is the presumed standard deviation of the outcome, [math]\displaystyle{ \alpha }[/math] is the type 1 error, [math]\displaystyle{ \beta }[/math] is the type II error and (Cohen's) d is the effect size - difference between the means divided by the pooled standard deviation.

# An example from http://www.stat.columbia.edu/~gelman/stuff_for_blog/c13.pdf#page=3
# Method 1.
require(pwr)
pwr.t.test(d=200/450, power=.8, sig.level=.05,
           type="two.sample", alternative="two.sided")
#
#     Two-sample t test power calculation 
#
#              n = 80.4
#              d = 0.444
#      sig.level = 0.05
#          power = 0.8
#    alternative = two.sided
#
# NOTE: n is number in *each* group

# Method 2.
2*(qnorm(.975) + qnorm(.8))^2*450^2/(200^2)
# [1] 79.5
2*(1.96 + .84)^2*450^2 / (200^2)
# [1] 79.4

And stats::power.t.test() function.

power.t.test(n = 79.5, delta = 200, sd = 450, sig.level = .05,
             type ="two.sample", alternative = "two.sided")
#
#     Two-sample t test power calculation 
#
#              n = 79.5
#          delta = 200
#             sd = 450
#      sig.level = 0.05
#          power = 0.795
#    alternative = two.sided
#
# NOTE: n is number in *each* group

R package related to power analysis

CRAN Task View: Design of Experiments

Russ Lenth Java applets

https://homepage.divms.uiowa.edu/~rlenth/Power/index.html

Bootstrap method

The upstrap Crainiceanu & Crainiceanu, Biostatistics 2018

Multiple Testing Case

Optimal Sample Size for Multiple Testing The Case of Gene Expression Microarrays

Unbalanced randomization

Can unbalanced randomization improve power?

Yes, unbalanced randomization can improve power, in some situations